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SAHOF Breaking News

30th Jun 2017

Vale John Monckton - Esteemed Member of the Sport Australia Hall of Fame


 

The Sport Australia Hall of Fame is mourning the passing of our esteemed member John Monckton who passed away peacefully in his sleep yesterday morning (29/06/2017) at his Fisherman's Reach (NSW) home, aged 79.

Monckton was inducted into The Sport Australia Hall of Fame in November 1999 for his contribution to Swimming.

A dual Olympian and world record holder across both freestyle and backstroke, he won silver in the 100m backstroke at the 1956 Melbourne Olympic Games, before representing Australia again at the Rome Olympics in 1960.

In between the boy from Armidale in the northern tablelands of New South Wales, won double gold in the 110 yards backstroke and 4x110 yards medley relay at the 1958 Commonwealth Games in Cardiff.

Monckton lived by the motto of 'Never give in' and this was evident in his final race at the 1960 Olympic Games. Before the Games he was seen as the gold medal prospect, even though fellow Aussie David Theile was the defending champion, Monckton held the world record of 61.5 seconds. Monckton led the qualifying in the heats and semi-finals, however, in the final, he misjudged the turn and broke a finger as he smashed into the wall, but swam on to finish seventh behind fellow Hall of Famer Theile who successfully defended the Olympic 100m backstroke title.

Chairman John Bertrand AO said “John was a true inspiration to swimming and certainly proved his success by ‘never giving in’. He was respected by all both in and out of the pool and will be missed by many.”

The Board, Members and staff of The Sport Australia Hall of Fame extend our deepest sympathies to the Monckton family.

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JOHN MONCKTON | ATHLETE MEMBER (SWIMMING) | The Sport Australia Hall of Fame

28/10/1938 - 29/06/2017

John Monckton is one of Australia's great backstroke swimmers of the 1950s, winning silver in the 100m backstroke at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics. Although he set multiple world records, he never won an Olympic gold medal.

An apprentice carpenter from the New England region of New South Wales, Monckton appeared to be primed to win gold at the 1956 Olympics. At the national team camp in Townsville before the games, he became the first person to swim the 400m backstroke in under five minutes. Although it was not a regularly contested event at international level, it was a promising sign for the Olympics. He also set world records in the 110yds and 220yds freestyle events.

At the 1956 Games, the Australians (David Theile and Monckton) were up against some daunting international talent, in the form of world record holder Al Wiggins of the USA and the Olympic champion Yoshi Oyakawa of Japan. The Australians bettered the Olympic record in both their heats and semi-finals. In the final, Monckton won silver behind Theile with Wiggins and Oyakawa the last two finishers.

In the absence of Theile, who had retired after the Olympics to study medicine at university, Monckton dominated backstroke swimming, winning the 110yds backstroke event and the 4x110yds medley relay at the 1958 Cardiff British Empire and Commonwealth Games.

Before the 1960 Rome Games, Monckton was seen as a gold medal prospect, even though Theile was the defending champion. Monckton held the world record of 61.5 seconds, and Theile's recent times were much slower than those of rival American's Frank McKinney and Bob Bennett.

Monckton lead the qualifying in the heats and semi-finals. However, in the final, he misjudged the turn and broke a finger as he smashed into the wall. He limped home in seventh position, with Theile successfully defending his title. Monckton continued competing in the hope of reaching a third Olympics in 1964, but retired after his performances began to deteriorate.

Inspiration: "Never give in"

 

The Sport Australia Hall of Fame John Monckton's Biography



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When considering the stature of an athlete or for that matter any person, I set great store in certain qualities which I believe to be essential in addition to skill. They are that the person conducts his of her life with dignity, with integrity, courage, and perhaps most of all, with modesty. These virtues are totally compatible with pride, ambition, and competitiveness.